Install Theme
Jay DeFeo, Rose, 1958-66
Over the holiday break, our team of interns spent some time looking at art slowly. Here’s Maggie Freeman’s write up of her experience with Jay DeFeo’s massive Rose, which she saw at SFMOMA:

Even after spending over 15 minutes with the painting, I’m still not sure what to make of it. As the most famous of DeFeo’s works, it was the one that most of the viewers were flocking to, and they all seemed to be suffering from the syndrome that occurs when you encounter any famous work of art in a museum, where you’re drawn to a work of art simply because it’s famous, and not for anything inherent in the piece itself (I call this the Mona Lisa syndrome). I felt the same way at first too, excited to be seeing the one work of DeFeo’s that is regularly featured in art history textbooks. But after a few minutes it made me sad more than anything else. The layers of cracked and fractured paint dividing the painting, once white but turned gray and black in places, brought to mind the ruins of a once-great cathedral. I couldn’t help but think of how DeFeo had spent over seven years of her life working on “The Rose,” and she never even got to finish it. She also didn’t live to see the work find fame – it was exhibited only once during her lifetime, at the Pasadena Museum of Art, and subsequently bought by the San Francisco Art Institute, where it was installed in the wall of a conference room. There, it sustained such damage that a false wall was built to cover the painting, obscuring it from view. 

Read her full article over on our Slow Art Day blog, and check back to see more posts of other intern’s experiences with slow art!

Jay DeFeo, Rose, 1958-66

Over the holiday break, our team of interns spent some time looking at art slowly. Here’s Maggie Freeman’s write up of her experience with Jay DeFeo’s massive Rose, which she saw at SFMOMA:

Even after spending over 15 minutes with the painting, I’m still not sure what to make of it. As the most famous of DeFeo’s works, it was the one that most of the viewers were flocking to, and they all seemed to be suffering from the syndrome that occurs when you encounter any famous work of art in a museum, where you’re drawn to a work of art simply because it’s famous, and not for anything inherent in the piece itself (I call this the Mona Lisa syndrome). I felt the same way at first too, excited to be seeing the one work of DeFeo’s that is regularly featured in art history textbooks. But after a few minutes it made me sad more than anything else. The layers of cracked and fractured paint dividing the painting, once white but turned gray and black in places, brought to mind the ruins of a once-great cathedral. I couldn’t help but think of how DeFeo had spent over seven years of her life working on “The Rose,” and she never even got to finish it. She also didn’t live to see the work find fame – it was exhibited only once during her lifetime, at the Pasadena Museum of Art, and subsequently bought by the San Francisco Art Institute, where it was installed in the wall of a conference room. There, it sustained such damage that a false wall was built to cover the painting, obscuring it from view. 

Read her full article over on our Slow Art Day blog, and check back to see more posts of other intern’s experiences with slow art!

  1. my-faraway-one reblogged this from slowartday
  2. quetzalcoatl100 reblogged this from oraciopa
  3. oraciopa reblogged this from thesoulchronicles
  4. thesoulchronicles reblogged this from slowartday
  5. inloveipersevere reblogged this from slowartday
  6. rvgblogsstuff reblogged this from slowartday
  7. kittensintocats reblogged this from slowartday and added:
    This has become my favorite painting. Before I saw it, I didn’t even know about it. But it drew me in with it’s energy....
  8. philterry reblogged this from slowartday
  9. thesecretofimmortality reblogged this from crystaliiizedrose and added:
    ]]>
  10. danlblack reblogged this from slowartday
  11. crystaliiizedrose reblogged this from slowartday
  12. earthgods reblogged this from slowartday
  13. slowartday posted this